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22 people missing, 900 evacuated after building collapses in China BEIJING – A landslide collapsed and buried buildings at and around an industrial park in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen on Sunday, leaving 27 people missing, authorities said. At least seven people were rescued after 18 buildings were buried and an area of 20,000 square meters (24,000 square yards) was covered with soil, the Ministry of Public Security’s firefighting bureau said in an online statement. Shenzhen’s public security bureau posted a notice online saying that eight hours after the landslide, 21 men and six women were unaccounted for. READ MORE: Beijing issues 2nd smog red alert, triggering car restrictions, school closures Shenzhen’s fire brigade said that one building had collapsed, but that the landslide had affected a large area in the northwestern outskirts of the city. Li Yikang, the deputy secretary general of the Shenzhen city government, said at a televised news conference that more than 900 people had been evacuated. Giving different figures than the fire authorities, Li said that four people had been rescued and 22 factory buildings buried, involving 15 companies. The reason for the discrepancies wasn’t immediately clear. Li said that nearly 1,500 people were involved in rescue efforts. State broadcaster China Central Television, or CCTV, said that there was a residential area next to the industrial zone, and that the buildings buried included two workers’ dormitories. Ren Jiguang, the deputy chief of Shenzhen’s public security bureau, told CCTV that most people had been moved to safety before the landslide hit. The Beijing Youth Daily, citing a local resident, reported that the soil that slid down onto the area had been piled up against a 100-meter (110-yard) -high hill after being dug up in the past two years in construction work. State media carried photos of what looked like at least one five-story building leaning over and partly crumpled in the industrial park, and a sea of brown soil covering a vast area around it.

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Finance ministers to meet in Ottawa to confront Canada’s new economic reality OTTAWA – Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau is expecting to hear from his provincial counterparts Monday about a familiar, contentious subject: equalization payments. Morneau, who will meet with regional ministers for a second day in Ottawa, released figures Sunday outlining how much the neediest provinces can expect to receive from the federal government in the next fiscal year. The constitutionally guaranteed equalization program will redistribute nearly $18 billion in 2016-17 to poorer provinces, where the cash will help fund public services. WATCH: Because it’s 2015: How is PM Trudeau going to deal with Canadians’ economic concerns? Under the formula, the same six so-called have-not provinces that received cash in 2015-16 – Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island – will get the payments again next year. That means provincial economies hit hard by low commodity prices – such as Alberta and Saskatchewan – will continue to pay into the program. On Sunday, Morneau appeared to want to steer clear of the sometimes thorny issue. “Equalization I’m sure will come up,” Morneau said when asked if he thought the equalization formula is fair when struggling, resource-reliant provinces like Alberta and Saskatchewan were still considered among the well-to-do. “I expect that at every meeting of the finance ministers that is a subject that people will discuss.” Quebec Finance Minister Carlos Leitao, whose province receives by far the most from the program, said Sunday that the equalization formula will eventually reflect the low energy prices. WATCH: New housing rules won’t harm first-time buyers: finance minister Leitao, a former bank economist, said the “very complex” calculation has yet to factor in the weak energy prices because it’s based on a three-year moving average of nominal gross domestic product. When asked about the formula’s fairness, Leitao said federal coffers take in cash from all provinces – including about 23 per cent that comes from Quebec. “So, a portion of it gets transferred back (to Quebec) and more,” he said as he arrived for a dinner meeting with the ministers. In 2016-17, Quebec will receive about $10 billion from the nearly $18-billion program. Historically, provinces have had their differences about equalization. Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall has expressed frustration with the formula, arguing it doesn’t easily take into account the changes in resource prices, such as oil and hydro, making it years behind the times. Wall has also said provinces like Manitoba and Quebec receive bigger payments because the formula doesn’t account for the revenues they rake in from hydro power. The calculation does, however, factor in non-renewable resource revenue from oil and gas. He has called for the payments to be halved to allow Ottawa to instead invest the money in things like infrastructure projects across the country. On Sunday, British Columbia Finance Minister Michael de Jong said he expected the ministers to raise the issue of equalization with Morneau as part of the broader talks about all federal transfers, including health payments. Asked if the current formula was fair, de Jong answered by saying he was happy his province is considered among those that don’t qualify for the payment. “Candidly, I don’t want to be a province that is categorized as have-not,” de Jong said. “At the same time, the distribution has to take place on an equitable basis.” Ontario Finance Minister Charles Sousa said his province has always given $11 billion more, year-over-year, than it has received – even when it has qualified for equalization. The province will receive $2.3 billion next year from the program. “So, still, Ontario is a net contributor to the federation and we’ll continue to be so and we recognize how important that is for us to have a strong federation,” Sousa said. He added that other provinces that have qualified for equalization have had “substantively more” per-capita support than Ontario. “But that’s OK,” Sousa said. “We want to support all provinces to be at their best and we will work together to do so.”

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FIFA ethics court bans Blatter, Platini for 8 years ZURICH – Banished from soccer’s ruling body for eight years for unethical conduct, Sepp Blatter won’t give up the presidency of his beloved FIFA without a fight. “I will fight. I will fight until the end,” Blatter said Monday at a news conference that started 90 minutes after he and former protege Michel Platini were each banned by FIFA’s ethics committee. It was a stunning removal of world soccer’s most powerful leaders over a $2 million payment by FIFA to Platini, the president of European soccer’s ruling body UEFA. The payment is also the subject of a criminal investigation in Switzerland. “I’m sad. It can’t go on this way. It’s not possible,” said the 79-year-old Blatter, who has spent more than half his life working for soccer’s scandal-hit governing body. “After 40 years, it can’t happen this way. I’m fighting to restore my rights.” Already serving a provisional ban, the elected FIFA president and his long-time likely successor were kicked out of the sport just two months before 209 member federations elect a new leader. Platini, a FIFA vice-president whose bid to succeed Blatter on Feb. 26 now looks over, described the proceedings as a “true mockery.” Their offences were judged to be conflict of interest and disloyalty to FIFA. They avoided life bans because corruption was not proven. Platini’s lawyer, Thibaud d’Ales, told The Associated Press it came as no surprise that the corruption charge had been dropped. “They used it with the sole purpose of dirtying Michel Platini, although they knew from the start it was an untenable argument,” D’Ales said. Guilty verdicts were expected. So were the subsequent denials of wrongdoing and promises of urgent appeals to FIFA and the Court of Arbitration for Sport. Blatter’s defiant display was a bonus for international media summoned to FIFA’s former headquarters, just hundreds of meters (yards) from the new building where he spent eight hours with four ethics judges last Thursday. The choice of venue hinted at a vintage Blatter show. He did not disappoint. Blatter invoked Nelson Mandela within a minute, pointing to the spot where the iconic South African leader had lifted the World Cup trophy 11 years ago, when his country was chosen as the host nation for the 2010 tournament. Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech, the Nobel organization and the United Nations were also referenced in a spirited 52-minute performance as he held court with more than 100 journalists. His last words were “I’ll be back, thank you.” Blatter’s trademark fighting talk was delivered while still sporting a strip of surgical tape on his right cheek after a minor medical procedure five days earlier. Blatter made it clear he regretted his current position but declared he was innocent of any wrongdoing. “I am not ashamed,” he said. “I am sorry that I am a punching ball. I am sorry for football. … I am now suspended eight years, suspended eight years. Suspended eight years for what?” Platini was also dismissive of the ethics commission’s work. He said its proceedings, which included a hearing earlier this month that he did not attend, had been “orchestrated… by governing bodies that I know well” to tarnish him. “I’m convinced that my fate was sealed before the Dec. 18 hearing and that this decision is just a pathetic manoeuvr to hide a true will of taking me out of the football world,” the Frenchman said. “My behaviour has always been faultless and I’m at peace with my own conscience.” Platini said he will also file a lawsuit in a civil court to seek damages for what he has endured during the ethics commission’s proceedings. In a brief statement, UEFA said it was “extremely disappointed” with the ruling and supported its leader’s right to clear his name. FIFA’s ethics judges decided that Blatter and Platini had broken ethics rules on conflicts of interest, breach of loyalty and offering or receiving gifts. Platini took $2 million of FIFA money in 2011 – a payment approved by Blatter as uncontracted salary for work as a presidential adviser from 1999-2002. In Monday’s verdict, Blatter was fined 50,000 Swiss francs ($50,250) and Platini 80,000 Swiss francs ($80,400). “Neither in his written statement nor in his personal hearing was Mr. Blatter able to demonstrate another legal basis for this payment,” the judges said. “By failing to place FIFA’s interests first and abstain from doing anything which could be contrary to FIFA’s interests, Mr. Blatter violated his fiduciary duty to FIFA. “His (Blatter’s) assertion of an oral agreement was determined as not convincing and was rejected by the chamber.” Blatter hit back at that conclusion during his news conference, portraying the ethics committee as saying of Platini and himself: “He’s a liar and I’m a liar.” “This is not correct,” Blatter said. Blatter acknowledged an administrative “error” in failing to register FIFA’s debt to Platini in its accounts for eight years, though he insisted: “This is nothing to do with the ethics regulations.” The Swiss had started tentatively and the grey bristles on his chin – that clearly showed he hadn’t shaven that morning – added to his aged appearance. Yet his voice grew stronger, seeming to take heart from gentle prompts and notes given by his only child, daughter Corinne, sitting to his left. He spoke in four languages and translated his own German, French and Spanish answers into English, clearly relishing the attention of a big audience again. By the end, with his top shirt button undone and tie loose, it was possible to forget that Blatter had faced a health scare on Nov. 1. “I am back, I am back, I am doing better,” he said. “I have the support of my daughter, I have the support of Linda (Barras), my love.” While Blatter wants to leave FIFA with his head high, the 60-year-old Platini wants to clear his name, pass a FIFA integrity check and be declared an official candidate in the election he had been favoured to win. Platini’s campaign has stalled since he was questioned on Sept. 25 in a Swiss federal investigation of suspected criminal mismanagement at FIFA. Switzerland’s attorney general has opened criminal proceedings against Blatter for the suspected “disloyal payment” of FIFA money to Platini and selling undervalued World Cup TV rights for the Caribbean. Platini was paid in February 2011, just before Blatter began campaigning for re-election against Mohamed bin Hammam of Qatar. Platini’s UEFA urged its members weeks before the June 2011 election to back Blatter, who was elected unopposed when Bin Hammam was implicated in bribery. Few FIFA officials knew of the Platini payment which emerged during a wider Swiss probe of the governing body’s business affairs, including suspected money laundering in the 2018 and 2022 World Cup bidding contests. “I have never cheated with money,” Blatter insisted, before claiming he still wielded authority in the sport. “I am still the president. Even if I am suspended, I am still the president.” __ AP Sports Writer Samuel Petrequin contributed from Paris.

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Sanders apologizes to Clinton, supporters for data breach MANCHESTER, N.H. —; Seeking to quell a burgeoning controversy, Bernie Sanders apologized to Hillary Clinton and his own supporters Saturday night for a data breach that allowed his campaign to access her team’s valuable information about voters. “This is not the type of campaign that we run,” Sanders said in the opening moments of the third Democratic debate. Still, he slammed the Democratic National Committee for briefly cutting off his campaign’s access to its own voter files, calling it an “egregious act.” Clinton quickly accepted the apology from Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont who is her closest rival in the Democratic race. READ MORE: Viewers’ Guide: Bernie Sanders faces tough questions at Democratic debate “We should move on because I don’t think the American people are interested in this,” said Clinton, the former secretary of state. Indeed, the debate moved quickly to national security, as the candidates tackled questions on terrorism in the wake of the attack in San Bernardino, California. The shootings, as well as earlier attacks in Paris, pushed national security to the forefront of the 2016 White House race. Still, the data breach appeared likely to overshadow the candidates’ policy discussions in some voters’ minds. The incident sparked fierce reactions from Sanders and Clinton staffers, a sharp shift from what until now had been a relatively civil Democratic primary. WATCH: Sanders’s campaign fights DNC over shared data suspension

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Edmontonians asked to fill empty store with donations EDMONTON- It’s an empty space right now, but it won’t stay that way for long. West Edmonton Mall staff are hoping generous Edmontonians will fill an empty store with new or pre-loved items destined for the Bissell Centre. The donated items will be displayed in the store front called The Holiday Closet. Clothing will even be styled on mannequins by a fashion stylist. Related Economy to blame for fewer donations, higher demand of Edmonton charities Diminishing charity donations More people in need of donations from Salvation Army’s Kettle Campaign this year “We thought creating a retail-type environment where items are displayed would change-up the donating experience,” said West Edmonton Mall’s vice president of marketing, Anna Alfonso. “Instead of dropping items into a bag, box or bin, people will see their items showcased. They will also get an idea of what might be needed, even in terms of sizes.” The Holiday Closet will be open until Tuesday, December 22. The goal is to fill the store with personal, household items, toys, and clothing at least two or three times. The Bissell Centre is an Edmonton-based non-profit organization that provides a variety of support services, ranging from from food and clothing to family support, housing, employment and more. The Holiday Closet is located near Entrance 1 on Europa Boulevard and will be open until December 22 during mall retail hours (Monday to Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.).

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Photo Gallery: The masses flock to German church for ‘Star Wars’ Sunday service BERLIN – The force is strong in Berlin. A church in the German capital invited “Star Wars” fans to attend a special service Sunday themed on the sci-fi blockbuster in an attempt to attract more young people into the pews. About 500 people heeded the call and attended the service, some carrying light saber props or wearing Darth Vader masks. It was more than twice as many as usually come to Zion Church on a Sunday. “We were very happy to see so many people in the church today,” said Protestant pastor Lucas Ludewig said after the service. “It’s great that there are subjects that people are interested in. They trust us to make them part of the church service without making it too Christian or too Star Wars, but to find a good compromise.” With the film’s theme song — played on the church’s organ — still echoing around the rafters, the 30-year-old said he came up with the idea of the “Star Wars” service while talking with fellow pastor Ulrike Garve, 29, about how much they were looking forward to the seventh instalment in the franchise “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” which opened Friday. A person dressed as the Darth Vader character sits inside the zion church in Berlin. TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images A person dressed as a Star Wars character stands in front the zion church in Berlin. TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images Vicar Ulrike Garve (R) holds up a toy saber next to vicar Lucas Ludewig inside the zion church in Berlin. TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images A person dressed as the chewbacca character sits inside the zion church in Berlin. TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images A person, center top, dressed as the ‘Star Wars Jawa’ character attends a Star Wars themed church service, at the Zion Church in Berlin. AP Photo/Markus Schreiber A person with a light saber stands in front of the altar inside the zion church in Berlin. TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images “‘Star Wars’ picks up religious images, including Christian images and maybe some from other religions,” said Ludewig. “In doing so, it shows that the Bible and the Church are part of our culture that keeps being reworked and reinterpreted.” Churchgoer Jonathan Wonneberger, dressed as a Jawa trader, described the service as a welcome change from tradition. “You don’t have to take everything that’s religious too seriously. Of course you have to treat it with respect, but when there’s a global event like Star Wars, it’s ok to jump on the bandwagon,” he said. Scott McGuire, sporting a Chewbacca costume, said he planned to go see the movie later. “I think the whole question of God is very interesting, but getting up early on a Sunday is one of those things. But for something like this, I’ll go,” he said.

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In Vancouver and elsewhere, cities to tame downtown white elephants VANCOUVER – It was a mid-century effort to launch Vancouver into the modern age — an elevated roadway made up of tonnes of concrete cutting through the city’s shiny downtown core to serve the almighty automobile. The failed attempt ultimately became a saving grace. After the colossal Georgia Viaduct was built in 1972, a grassroots uproar stopped the construction of what would have been a multi-lane expressway. The City of Vancouver voted last month to tear down the twinned bridge while discussion continues over construction of a new street network below it. Other Canadian cities are also contending with their own white elephants of infrastructure — vestiges of the freeway-building craze in vogue during the 1960s and ’70s that inspired public uprisings. “It’s not overstating it to say that it was citizen protest against the plans for those expressways that had a lot to do with the salvation of Canadian inner cities,” said Christopher Leo, professor emeritus of urban planning at the University of Winnipeg. “We have every reason to be really grateful. The fact that we still have viable downtowns has a great deal to do with the cancellation of those schemes.” Leo said the particular brand of planning logic originated in the United States as part of a Cold War project aimed at protecting America from the Soviet threat by extending a reliable transportation network across the country. “Part of the idea of it was that you wanted to build overpasses high enough that you could run tanks under them,” he said, though that initial reasoning served less of an impetus in the Canadian experience.” Across the country sits another such example from the era — the Cogswell Interchange in Halifax, built in the post-war suburban boom of the late 1960s. The so-called Road to Nowhere consists of a swath of interlinking overpasses and roadways occupying about 6.5 hectares of prime ocean-side real estate. It was to have linked up to Harbour Drive, a proposed six-lane expressway wrapping around the city’s idyllic waterfront. Protests over the demolition of 150 historic properties quickly put a stop to the project, but not before the sprawling concrete behemoth was built. “For 40 years, the interchange has stood as a remnant of a bygone era of thinking and, in many ways, an albatross around the city’s neck,” wrote a Halifax-based planning and design firm in a report commissioned by the city. Urban-planning academic and former Vancouver politician Gordon Price described how the freeway fetish that characterized the mid-century saw transportation logic initially intended to link municipalities together mistakenly applied within city limits. He said the move threatened the urban fabric of downtown cores. “You actually have to destroy the idea of the city in order to do it, because cities are deliberately designed to be areas of interaction and congestion,” Price said. “That’s the point of them. People come together to trade, to interact, to exchange, whether it’s goods or money or DNA.” The wrong-headed planning approach was never ultimately killed, he said, but died off through “suffocation” as the federal and provincial governments gradually backed out of funding commitments. Toronto’s oft-maligned Gardiner Expressway is another example of a curtailed Canadian freeway project. However, its marginal usefulness in managing some traffic has turned it into what Leo described as “a really big and knotty political problem that nobody seems to know the answer to.” Vancouver’s former chief planner Brent Toderian used the term “almost scandalous” to describe the lengthy debate over the Gardiner’s future, adding the public money spent on the issue amounts to failure. “It’s a political decision,” he said. “It’s essentially incontrovertible city-making evidence running up against politics.” Toderian said that as cities such as Vancouver and Halifax re-imagine their downtown spaces, they face “possibly the most powerful city-making moments in the Canadian urban landscape.” “These opportunities are too important to squander with even an average result,” he said, citing Montreal’s Bonaventure Expressway as another example that amounts to a white elephant of infrastructure from the past. “It starts with tearing them down,” he said.

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Regina group plays Santa and delivers presents not for kids, but seniors REGINA – For many, the Christmas holidays is spent with family and friends but not everyone is as fortunate. Santa for Seniors Project Inc. hopes to change that. They use car trunks as sleighs but refrain from calling their organizer jolly old Saint Nick. “I think I would maybe be Santa’s head elf, just organizing things and making sure things get to where they need to go,” said Sean Louvel. Santa for Seniors is a Regina based non-profit outreach program that uses volunteers to provide Christmas cheer for elders, one gift at a time. “People get busy and they don’t always have time to visit their grandparents. And quite often if people live to a certain age their friends and family haven’t lived that long or they don’t have friends and family nearby,” explained Louvel. Usually, Santa’s presents are meant for kids but with this program anonymous names are posted on a list with their requests and volunteers choose a name and buy the present. “When we heard about this Santa for Seniors, I gave Sean a call right away and I told him we wanted to participate,” said Cecilia Ravasco, who bought gifts for 25 seniors with her ministry group ANCOP (Answering the Cry of the Poor). The number of volunteers has been growing. This year 12 senior homes will be visited and 900 gifts delivered. That’s up from 400 last year and is the largest in the project’s six year history. “This is the time to share, Christmas is the time for sharing,” said Ravasco. . “It’s their opportunity to basically celebrate a parent or a grandparent who’s passed on,” added Ken Louvel, Sean’s father. So, what would someone who’s lived decades on this earth want for Christmas? “Some of the things are so simple. For example some say, ‘I haven’t had a new shirt in 10 years, can you get me a sweater? And it’s just like, yeah” said Louvel. Many of the seniors are on fixed incomes with not much to get by and sometimes a simple gift can make a difference. “When people get to feel that, to feel that someone cares and someone remembers them and honours them for that, that to me is why we do it every year,” added Louvel.

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Package found on diverted Air France plane was a hoax: official NAIROBI, Kenya – The suspicious device discovered in the bathroom of an Air France flight was a hoax, the CEO of Air France said Sunday. The Boeing 777 was heading to Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris from Mauritius when its pilots requested an emergency landing early Sunday at Kenya’s coastal city of Mombasa. The device was made of cardboard, paper and a household timer, said Frederic Gagey, the head of Air France. “This object did not contain explosives,” said Gagey at a news conference in Paris. An Air France jet liner which made an emergency landing is seen at Moi International Airport in Mombasa, Kenya Sunday, Dec. 20, 2015. The Boeing 777 Air France flight 463 from Mauritius to Paris was forced to land in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa after a device suspected to be a bomb was found in the lavatory, a Kenyan police official said Sunday. AP Photo/Edwin Kana Gagey congratulated the crew for their cool-headed reaction to divert the plane. A safety check was carried out in the bathroom before the flight, he said. He denied any security failure in the flight, saying that passengers are checked and sometimes double-checked on flights. Six passengers are being questioned over the incident, said a Kenyan police official, who is part of the investigation and who insisted on anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the press. All the 473 pax of Air France 463 have been screened at the airport lounge & taken to hotels in Mombasa. pic.twitter长沙桑拿/ffyumbEsRg — Kenya Airports (@KenyaAirports) December 20, 2015 The object, believed to be an explosive device has successfully been retrieved from the aircraft which was destined to Paris from Mauritius — Kenya Airports (@KenyaAirports) December 20, 2015 A passenger reported the device to the cabin crew who informed the pilots leading to an emergency landing at the Moi International Airport in Mombasa. One of those being interrogated is the man who reported the package. The plane was carrying 459 passengers and 14 crew members on board and had left Mauritius at 9 p.m., said Kenyan police spokesmand Charles Owino. All passengers were safely evacuated and the device was taken out, said Owino. READ MORE: Experts weigh in on recent spate of bomb threats on Canadian flights A passenger who spoke to journalists after leaving the plane in Mombasa described the emergency landing. “The plane just went down slowly, slowly, slowly, so we just realized probably something was wrong,” said Benoit Lucchini of Paris. “The personnel of Air France was just great, they were just wonderful. So they keep everybody calm. We did not know what was happening,” said Lucchini. “So we secured the seat belt to land in Mombasa because we thought it was a technical problem but actually it was not a technical problem. It was something in the toilet. Something wrong in the toilet, it could be a bomb.” The Indian Ocean island of Mauritius is a popular destination for French tourists. France has been under a state of emergency since the Nov. 13 attacks in Paris that left 130 people dead. The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for that and the Oct. 31 crash of a Russian passenger in the Sinai desert that killed all 224 people aboard. Moscow has said that the crash was caused by a bomb on the plane. Two Air France flights from the U.S. to Paris were diverted on Nov. 18 after bomb threats were received. No bombs were found on the planes from Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Steven Ciaran, 30 an Irishman working on Reunion Island, said he was seated at back of the plane watching a movie when he noticed the rushed movement of cabin crew preparing emergency drills. Cabin crew told him it was a technical problem and they created a calm environment among the passengers. “I was very distressed because I could see we were far from the destination,” said Ciaran. He said passenger reassured each other. “I thought the plane had difficulty and not that it had anything to do with terrorism,” he said. The plane arrived in Mombasa at around 1.30 a.m. and the passengers disembarked using an emergency slides, he said. A couple of people got twisted ankles but no one seriously injured, Ciaran said. Ciaran says he was travelling from Reunion to Dublin for the Christmas holiday.

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Edmontonians pay respects to murdered Mac’s store employees EDMONTON- A small memorial of flowers, teddy bears, and candles is growing outside the 108 Street Mac’s location where 41-year old Ricardo Cenabre was gunned down early Friday morning. Pleasantview resident Hildegard Stratkotter took a moment Saturday afternoon to lay flowers at the site. “He has family. He has friends. He came here for a better life and then he gets gunned down.” “It’s upsetting that somebody would just go in there and kill somebody. It turns my stomach,” Stratkotter said. Related ‘Unnecessary, gratuitous, evil’: 2 clerks shot to death in Edmonton robberies Alberta labour group calls for better safety for night workers following deadly shootings Edmonton school rallies to support family of murdered Mac’s clerk Second victim in Mac’s store robbery and shooting spree identified The senior often bought milk at the local store and remembers the victim, an immigrant from the Philippines.  “I’m quite sure I spoke to him. He has family. He has friends. He came here for a better life and then he gets gunned down.” “It feels like somebody of your own died, passed away for no reason at all,” she added. Police tape blocked off access to the convenience store, which remained closed, on Saturday. Stratkotter said the neighbourhood has seen a lot of break-ins recently and after this latest incident, she won’t be going to Mac’s at night. Stratkotter also went on to say the community is in shock and described the three accused, a 26-year-old man, a 24-year-old man and a 13-year-old boy, as animals. “They can’t have any feeling,” she said. “Human beings do not kill each other.” At the Mill Woods Mac’s, the police tape has been removed but a hand-written sign on the door explained the store won’t reopen until Monday. That’s the location where another Mac’s employee, 35-year-old Karanpal Bhangu was murdered. Regular customers stopped by to pay their respects – expressing shock at the senselessness of Banghu’s death. Lawrence Gomez always buys his cigarettes from the store and had made friends with the clerks. “I am from India and it’s really hard to hear these kinds of things happening in Canada nowadays.” Gomez isn’t the only one who frequently spoke with staff. Brendan O’Neill was also a regular customer. “There were two guys in there that were super cool. I go in there all the time and talk to them. It’s just brutal what happened,” he said. O’Neill was planning to go to the Mac’s the night of the shootings, but decided it was too cold once he got outside. “It’s pretty frightening but I don’t really care about me. I care more about the guy who got shot.” Other customers also expressed concerns about their own safety while shopping. “I feel so uneasy now, to come into the store. I don’t know if I’ll feel safe again. Will I come here again? I don’t know,” said Sophie La.

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