Powered by Bjzk!

Default utility Image

Edmonton Airport bracing for busy Christmas Eve holiday travel EDMONTON — It’s the busiest time of year at the Edmonton International Airport, which traditionally sees a 10 to 20 per cent increase in travel around this time of year. But this year is a little bit different according to EIA’s director of public affairs. Heather Hamilton says the busiest day of 2015 will be Christmas Eve, while in years past, it’s always been the Friday before the holiday when students begin their winter vacation. That’s unfortunate. Someone thought they could get thru @FlyEIA security with big scotch. @GlobalEdmonton #yeg pic.twitter长沙桑拿/Ot5LVTCyw3 — kendra slugoski (@kendraslugoski) December 21, 2015 Watch below: It’s the busiest time of the year for the Edmonton International Airport. As Kendra Slugoski reports, stalls at security could put everybody behind. She offers one vital tip to improve your travel experience. “The number one thing that people can do is get to the airport early,” Hamilton advises. “The planes are full so if you miss your plane you’re going to have a really hard time getting on another one,” she adds. Here are a few other handy tips: Look through your carry-on bag before you leave for the airport for items that aren’t permitted.Avoid wearing clothing which will set off the metal detector as you pass through security.Check your flight status before you leave for the airport.Don’t wrap Christmas gifts until after your flight. To help with the rush additional airport staff are helping travelers with their bags, free gift wrapping is also available once you get through security. READ MORE: 5 tips to make your holiday travel experience less stressful Santa will also be on site until Christmas Eve. So Xmas lights made out of shotgun shells-not allowed while flying. @GlobalEdmonton @FlyEIA #yeg pic.twitter长沙桑拿/mqZ3YTukzj — kendra slugoski (@kendraslugoski) December 21, 2015 Related Holiday travel tips Handling holiday travel with ease Airport and highways busy with holiday travellers

Default utility Image

Crowdfunding campaign raises over $20k for Brampton family who lost home to fire TORONTO – A Brampton man says his family has seen “nothing but positivity” after losing their home in a fire earlier this month. Emmanuel Teji lived with his mother and sister at 9 Darras Court until a massive blaze ripped through the townhouse complex on December 12, displacing eight families and destroying homes. Teji’s mother Parveen Thaper was unable to afford home insurance, so the family wasn’t covered for its losses. READ MORE: Massive fire rips through town house complex in Brampton, 8 homes destroyed Standing outside the wreckage of their home the next day, Teji and his sister started a GoFundMe campaign, typing on his phone and taking turns to keep their fingers warm, he said. In just over a week, the campaign has raised over $22,000, surpassing its $20,000 goal with donations from friends and strangers alike. One family gave $700 instead of doing a family gift exchange. “It’s just great to know that there are so many people out there willing to support you and sometimes people you don’t know,” Teji said. Teji said the family plans to use the money for rent until their home is livable again, but says they plan to save much of it to give back to the community. “A lot of that money is going to be put back,” he said. “We’re deciding how do we use this best so we can get back up as a family, but also how to give back to people. The best thing to do right now is put that money aside and save it until we’re in a better place.” An artist and filmmaker, Teji lost upwards of $10,000 in camera equipment as well, but he says the manufacturer Panasonic may replace much of it. Teji says the outpouring of generosity has “really taught us the value of giving” and wants to thank everyone who contributed to helping the family get back on its feet. “It’s just been a lot of positivity and I have no words aside from just thank you, thank you so much,” he said. “I don’t know what else to say, we appreciate it way more than people can even imagine.”

Default utility Image

Trudeau looking beyond Security Council at UN, as countries vie for seats OTTAWA – Justin Trudeau may want to bring Canada back to the world as an international player but the prime minister will likely have to win another election before the country returns to one of the globe’s most powerful tables. Trudeau all but ruled out a return for Canada to the powerful United Nations Security Council any time before 2019 during a roundtable interview with this past week. Canada’s historic loss of a seat on the council in 2010 to tiny Portugal has been often cited as one of the major foreign policy failings of the previous Conservative government, which at times viewed the UN with disdain. WATCH: Justin Trudeau criticizes Harper government for losing seat at UN Security Council Trudeau has made Canada’s reengagement with the UN and other global multilateral organizations a core aspect of his foreign policy. Trudeau acknowledged what senior bureaucrats told his new government after it won power in October: that it is unlikely Canada would be in a position to vie for a temporary two-year seat until sometime early in the next decade. That’s because other western European countries in the UN group to which Canada belongs have declared their intentions to run, effectively filling up the ballot up to 2020 and beyond. “Yes, getting back onto the Security Council would be nice. And we’re obviously aware of challenges around timing on that,” Trudeau said. “But it’s not the only way that one can make a difference in the UN. There is a need for Canada to engage across a broad range of issues, and that’s exactly what we’re going to do.” Trudeau cited a renewed commitment to peacekeeping and climate change as two areas where Canada can work within the UN to be a constructive player. He also said Canada has many avenues to pursue engagement with the permanent members of the council, including China and “even Russia if we wanted to.” The Security Council has faced heavy criticism in recent years because it has been powerless to stop the civil war that has killed 300,000 people in Syria since 2011 because Russia – one of the five permanent, veto-wielding members – has consistently blocked concrete action against a country it considers an ally. But on Friday, the council displayed rare unanimity when it endorsed a roadmap for a negotiated peace in Syria that involves government and opposition groups. WATCH: What happens with Bashar al-Assad after U.N. agreement? Michael Grant, Canada’s current UN ambassador, said the Friday agreement was encouraging. But in a separate interview with , he acknowledged that Canada’s return to the Security Council is still many years off. “If you look at those countries that have declared going forward, it does limit the opportunities. But we’ve served on it several times in the past, and we look forward to serving on it again,” he said. Canada last served on the council in 1999-2000, its sixth term, dating back to the late 1940s. Ordinarily, said Grant, the campaigning for the next seat would have started after its most recently completed term. But the Conservatives abandoned all campaigning for the council after the 2010 loss. READ MORE: Will the UN Security Council unite to fight ISIS? What would that mean for Canada? Like Trudeau, Grant said Canada has renewed its engagement in other UN forums. Canada recently joined a working group on international aboriginal issues, and will do more to support UN peacekeeping efforts – another foreign policy priority of Trudeau’s. Canada’s contribution to UN missions has dropped off dramatically to a few dozen actual boots on the ground compared with thousands of troops in the 1990s. Grant said Canada remains the ninth largest contributor to peace operations. Its future contributions of personnel would be mainly specialized military experts, not massive deployments of troops, he said. Trudeau said he expects developing countries to continue to provide “the infantry troops, the basic bodies” of large peace keeping missions, but his goal is for Canada to add value. “Canada actually has specific skills that many of the countries that are doing peacekeeping don’t necessarily have, whether it’s engineer corps, whether it’s medical, whether it’s officers and bilingualism or even French speaking,” said Trudeau. READ MORE: UN Security Council set to adopt resolution aimed at stifling Islamic State funding Grant said Trudeau has sent clear foreign policy signals. But challenges clearly remain. Trudeau promised during the federal campaign that Canada would sign the UN Arms Trade Treaty. All of Canada’s NATO allies, including the U.S. have signed on to the treaty that went into force in December 2014. That means Canada has now missed its opportunity to simply join the treaty. Now Canada must essentially apply to join, only after undertaking a legislative or regulatory review to ensure there are no roadblocks in our domestic law, said Grant. “Our colleagues in Ottawa are looking at it,” said Grant. “It will take a little bit of time.” Meanwhile, Grant is getting lots of positive feedback from fellow UN ambassadors about Canada’s future, particularly Trudeau’s decision to appoint an equal number of men and women to cabinet. “This has resonated throughout the UN system, and I think that’s a very positive message that’s being sent,” Grant said. “Gender and equality has really been top of mind for everyone in the UN system.”

Default utility Image

Young man burned by electric shock, on road to recovery MONTREAL – This past August, 18-year-old, Kevin Bolusi and his friends decided to explore an area they’d never been to before. They were walking along the Rivière des Prairies and then hiked up along the Deux-Montagnes train tracks, that connect Pierrefonds-Roxboro to Laval. “He [Kevin] walked along the tracks over here and then he started to climb the super structure,” said his father, Phil Belusi. “He got all the way to the top and he was about to descend, hanging by his hands. He said he was hanging and trying to center himself to fall and that’s when he got electrocuted.” Kevin fell from the structure onto the rail lines, 30 feet below, in flames. “He didn’t have one broken bone,” said Bolusi. “He had no internal injuries, but unfortunately the 25,000 volts gave him third degree burns on over 75 per cent of his body.” Bolusi told Global News that when the accident happened, there were no visible warning signs from where Kevin had entered and those that were there were covered in graffiti. A photo taken in August 2015, shows the bridge where Kevin Bolusi was injured. The warning signs are covered in graffiti. Photo courtesy of the Bolusi family. Phil Bolusi Since then, two new signs have been installed, but Bolusi says that isn’t enough. He believes there should be signs on both sides of the bridge. “They put two brand new signs, but they didn’t put anything over here,” he said, showing the side of the bridge where Kevin climbed up. New warning signs now appear on the bridge where Kevin was injured in August 2015. But Phil Bolusi believes there should be signs on both sides of the bridge. Sebastien Gagnon-Dorval Since the accident, Kevin has been living at a Montreal rehab hospital. After two months in an induced coma, he required the removal of his left leg due to fourth degree burns. “Basically from the start of the accident I had to like relearn how to do a lot of things, like a lot of basic things as well,” he said. Although medicare will cover his medical expenses and one basic prosthetic leg, Kevin’s family believes he will benefit more from a bionic leg. And those can cost between $5,000 up to $80,000. So he started a Go Fund Me page. Bolusi’s hopes is that it’ll raise enough money for a better leg for Kevin, but also the funds will go towards putting Kevin through school, something Kevin is anxious to get back to. “It hasn’t really affected me internally or psychologically,” he said. “The need for school is still there.” Kevin is staying positive and recently got some good news – he get’s to go home for Christmas, something he can’t wait to do one day, for good.

Default utility Image

In memoriam: Remembering notable Quebecers who died in 2015 MONTREAL – From some of Quebec’s most outspoken politicians, a hockey hall-of-famer and one of the province’s most notable religious leaders, Global News remembers those who passed away in 2015. Claude Ruel, the former head coach of the Montreal Canadiens, died at the age of 76. UPC/ Claude Ruel (February 9, 2015) Claude Ruel was a professional hockey coach for the Montreal Canadiens from 1968 to 1970, and then again from 1979 to 1981. He died at the age of 76. Ruel grew up playing hockey in Sherbrooke and received his first coaching job in the 1960s with the Montreal Junior Canadiens. He led a talented group of players to a Stanley Cup championship during his first year. Former Montreal Canadiens Elmer Lach waits as a banners with his number is to be raised during a retirement ceremony before an NHL hockey game in Montreal, December 4, 2009. AP Photo/, Paul Chiasson Elmer Lach (April 4, 2015) Elmer Lach was the last surviving member of the Punch Line, who dominated the NHL for four seasons in the 1940s. He died at the age of 97. Centering between Toe Blake and Maurice Richard, Lach won the Hart Trophy as the league’s most valuable player in 1945, the Art Ross as the league’s point leader twice and the Stanley Cup three times, in 1944, 1946 and 1953. Cardinal Jean-Claude Turcotte stands next to a portrait of Brother André, prior to a news conference in Montreal, Friday, Feb. 19, 2010. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes Cardinal Jean-Claude Turcotte (April 8, 2015) Archbishop of Montreal from 1990 to 2012, and a cardinal since 1994, Jean-Claude Turcotte rose from Montreal’s east end to become one of Canada’s best-known religious figures. After his death at the age of 78, many Montrealers spoke of his personal warmth and compassion, as well as his commitment to fighting and reducing poverty. Quebec Sen. Pierre Claude Nolin sits in the Senate chamber in Ottawa, Thursday Nov.27, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld Pierre-Claude Nolin (April 23, 2015) Although he was Speaker of the Senate during the final years of the Stephen Harper era, Pierre-Claude Nolin was best remembered by Canada’s political class as a man able to work beyond party lines for the genuine good of the country. Appointed to the Senate by Brian Mulroney in 1993, by many accounts Nolin did not always toe the Conservative line on issues like prison reform and marijuana legalization. Nolin, 64, held the position of Speaker for only a few months before succumbing to pancreatic cancer. Beth Whittall seen in an undated photo from Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame. Canada's Sports Hall of Fame Elizabeth Whittall (May 1, 2015) Elizabeth Whittall, a Montreal-born competitive swimmer, passed away at the age of 78. Among her many achievements, she won a silver medal in the 1954 British Empire and Commonwealth Games and two gold medals at the 1955 Pan American Games. Whittall was awarded the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada’s top athlete for 1955 and was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame. In 1987, at the age of 50, she set a Canadian record in the 200-metre freestyle for competitors in the 50-to-54 age group. Whittall was posthumously inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame on June 17, 2015. Former Quebec Premier Jacques Parizeau in Montreal, Saturday, March 2, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS IMAGES/Graham Hughes. Jacques Parizeau (June 1, 2015) Jacques Parizeau, remembered as one of the true giants of Quebec politics, died at the age of 84. The former Parti Québécois premier was the driving force behind the 1995 sovereignty referendum; he retired from politics after the ‘Yes’ campaign narrowly failed. His infamous “money and the ethnic vote” comment followed him for the rest of his life, but his contribution to Quebec politics was honoured with a state funeral, attended by political figures from all parties and levels of government. Montreal Mayor Jean Doré raises a pen before signing the city register after being sworn in, Montreal, Que., Nov. 20, 1986. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Bill Grimshaw Jean Doré (June 15, 2015) The first mayor of the post-Jean Drapeau era, Jean Doré, passed away at the age of 70 after battling pancreatic cancer. His MCM party swept to power in 1986, ushering in a new, more democratic way of running the city following decades of closed-door municipal politics. He served two terms, overseeing the creation of the city’s bike path network and numerous parks and beaches, including the one named after him on Île Notre-Dame. In this photo taken Saturday, March 2, 2013, Dr. Arthur Porter speaks with a reporter at his home in Nassau, Bahamas. Jeff Todd/AP/ Arthur Porter (June 30, 2015) The mercurial entrepreneur and physician at the centre of one of the city’s highest-profile scandals died of lung cancer in a Panama prison, just two weeks after his 59th birthday. Appointed CEO of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) and tasked with overseeing the construction of the Glen Site hospital, Porter resigned in late 2011 amid allegations of bribery, corruption and fraud. He never faced justice in Canada, but his wife Pamela Porter has since pleaded guilty to money-laundering. Rabbi Shoham was put to rest on Tuesday, September 22, 2015. Beth Zion Congregation Rabbi Sidney Shoham (September 20, 2015) The Baltimore-born rabbi of the Beth Zion Congregation in Côte-Saint-Luc died at the age of 86. Shoham, a towering figure in the Montreal Jewish community, known as a powerful orator and tireless organizer, was the only rabbi to chair the Combined Jewish Appeal. He also co-founded the Canadian Rabbinic Cabinet. Edwin Briggs (November 29, 2015) The former mayor of the City of Beaconsfield, Edwin Briggs, who was elected as Councillor from 1956 until 1960 and served as Mayor from 1960 until 1982, passed away at the age of 90. He is remembered as one of the actors who contributed to the growth of the city. Under his administration, Beaconsfield experienced a boom in the development of its social and sports resources, including the construction of city hall, the recreation centre, the library, the fire station, the sewage treatment plant, soccer and baseball fields as well as the lawn bowling greens. Former Montreal Canadiens Dickie Moore responds to questions in Ottawa on June 1, 2007. Paul Chiasson/ Dickie Moore (December 19, 2015) Dickie Moore was a gritty goal-scorer and playmaker who was part of the Montreal Canadiens dynasty of the 1950s – though he wasn’t quite as famous as some of his legendary teammates. Moore, who died at the age of 84, was too often a footnote in tales of the great Habs teams that won five Stanley Cups in a row from 1956 to 1960. It was a group that boasted Maurice (Rocket) Richard, Jean Béliveau, Bernard (Boom Boom) Geoffrion, Doug Harvey and goalie Jacques Plante. [email protected]长沙夜网Follow @rachel_lau

Recent Posts

Default utility Image Edmonton Airport bracing for busy Christmas Eve holiday travel

EDMONTON — It’s the busiest time of year at the Edmonton...

Default utility Image Crowdfunding campaign raises over $20k for Brampton family who lost home to fire

TORONTO – A Brampton man says his family has seen “nothing...

Default utility Image Trudeau looking beyond Security Council at UN, as countries vie for seats

OTTAWA – Justin Trudeau may want to bring Canada back...

Default utility Image Young man burned by electric shock, on road to recovery

MONTREAL – This past August, 18-year-old, Kevin Bolusi and his...

Default utility Image In memoriam: Remembering notable Quebecers who died in 2015

MONTREAL – From some of Quebec’s most outspoken politicians, a hockey...

Recent Posts

Default utility Image Default utility Image Default utility Image Default utility Image Default utility Image

Recent Posts

Default utility Image Edmonton Airport bracing for busy Christmas Eve holiday travel

EDMONTON — It’s the busiest time of year at the Edmonton...

Default utility Image Crowdfunding campaign raises over $20k for Brampton family who lost home to fire

TORONTO – A Brampton man says his family has seen “nothing...

Default utility Image Trudeau looking beyond Security Council at UN, as countries vie for seats

OTTAWA – Justin Trudeau may want to bring Canada back...

Default utility Image Young man burned by electric shock, on road to recovery

MONTREAL – This past August, 18-year-old, Kevin Bolusi and his...

Default utility Image In memoriam: Remembering notable Quebecers who died in 2015

MONTREAL – From some of Quebec’s most outspoken politicians, a hockey...

Tag Cloud