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Impending guard strike may put prisoners’ rights ‘in peril’, expert says A strike could see prisoners locked in their cells without access to communal spaces, classes or potentially doctor’s appointments, said Kelly Hannah-Moffat, director of the Centre of Criminology and Socio-legal Studies at the University of Toronto. Earlier this month, members of the Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU) rejected a tentative agreement with the province. Followup negotiations failed on Friday prompting the union to ask for a “no board report,” meaning a conciliator concludes the two sides aren’t ready to agree on a contract. The correctional and probation officers would be in a legal strike position within 17 days of such a report being issued. Representatives from the Treasury Board and the correctional services ministry did not comment on the union’s request for a “no board report.” The government issued a news release only saying it was ready to head back to the bargaining table at any time, but declined to answer further questions. READ MORE: Releasing Ottawa prison beating video endangers guards, union says If the union made good on its threat to walk out, managers at the province’s 28 correctional facilities, detention centres and jails would take over the guards’ work, sending many of those institutions into lockdown, said OPSEU president Warren (Smokey) Thomas. Thomas noted that it would be within the government’s authority to order guards back to work, but “there would be consequences” if they did that, he did not elaborate. Other unionized workers like nurses and maintenance staff would have to continue working during any strike, but Hannah-Moffat said the ratio of staff to employees would become much worse. “People would  be attempting to issue medication and to maintain safety and security in the institution, but because you have a whole segment of people who are not working … it would be very difficult to move people around the institution in the way they normally would,” she said, adding that appointments with psychologists and educational programs may have to be cancelled. “It puts the rights of individuals in peril, in that they won’t be able to access regular services or programming.” She added that managers, who would take over guards’ roles in the event of a strike, could also be put at risk. “You’re going to have people doing jobs that they’re not necessarily accustomed to doing,” she said. “In extreme circumstances, there could be increased risk of incidents occurring, especially if you can’t support people in crisis.” The union says the threat of strike is necessary. Thomas said the workers are concerned about overcrowding and under-staffing in jails. He said those conditions led to an officer in the Thunder Bay jail being taken hostage by prisoners earlier this month. The officer was taken hostage after a group of prisoners took control over a portion of the jail, the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services said. They confirmed that the officer and three prisoners were taken to hospital with injuries following the incident, which they called “shocking”. “I’m just stumped as to what it would take for the government to realize they have a problem,” Thomas said. “The vast majority of my members don’t want to strike, but I’ll tell you now, they will,” he added. “And that clock has started tickin’.”

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Ontario mayor’s letter insists province stop online ticket gouging SARNIA, Ont. —; Mayor Mike Bradley’s letter to the Ontario attorney general has a joking tone, but the message is a serious one that speaks to many music fans: stop online ticket resellers from gouging concertgoers. Bradley was shocked to see what happened when tickets for Toronto shows like Bruce Springsteen and Adele were sold out in minutes and appeared on broker sites for hugely inflated prices. READ MORE: Adele shows across Canada sell out in minutes and fans feel frustrated He wrote to the attorney general insisting on better consumer protections for concertgoers. “Once the tickets for the Toronto concert were put on sale they were sold out in minutes. On the online ticket broker sites the prices were often three to five times higher than the face value of the seats,” he said. Then the Bruce Springsteen fan in him truly takes over, and the letter continues riddled with song references. “Bruce fans had High Hopes they would be Dancing in the Dark on the floor of the Air Canada Centre… Instead, fans have gotten the Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out and will not be able to relive their Glory Days,” it continues. Bradley doesn’t take issue with scalpers reselling for a profit – even though reselling a ticket for more than face value is technically illegal under Ontario’s Ticket Speculation Act – but insists that price caps are needed. Many Adele fans were priced out of the market this week after tickets sold out within 30 minutes Thursday, then appeared for sale on StubHub with some sellers asking over $5,000 for seats in the Air Canada Centre balcony. “This is now becoming the norm,” Bradley told Global News. “You saw something like 8,000 tickets for sale across Toronto and people still couldn’t get tickets and they had to go to StubHub. “[Ontario] just brought in legislation to control payday loans. We control credit card interest rates. So why couldn’t we put a reasonable cap on ticket prices?” he asked. “People shouldn’t be denied buying a reasonable ticket at a reasonable price.” Bradley’s letter adds a snide postscript poking fun at some music fans. “The same practice has happened to Nickelback and Celine Dion fans; however, I did not speak up at that time because I believe when people make poor life choices they should be responsible for their own actions.” He says he’s gotten some good-natured responses from Dion fans but isn’t concerned about Nickelback blowback, because “Nickelback fans don’t read.” He says the attorney general hasn’t responded yet, but he’s hopeful that the government will act. “With the stroke of a pen you could being some care and control to the price of tickets and these agencies would have to abide by that, say they can’t sell for more than twice face value,” he suggests. “I think the government should get the message that they’ve got a lot of unhappy consumers and this is something they can take the lead on, which will cost them nothing to act on.”

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Syrian refugees arrive in Saskatoon SASKATOON – Fourteen Syrian refugees arrived in Saskatoon Saturday evening. A crowd welcomed them at the arrival gate with cheering, clapping, and singing. They were overwhelmed and exhausted. A few are sick and will need medical attention. READ MORE: Medical providers preparing for refugees in Saskatoon Related Saskatoon-bound refugees landing in Canada Friday New refugees will seize their ‘golden opportunities’ in Canada Impromptu wedding thrown for Syrian refugee couple in Saskatoon The refugees were quickly taken to a room in the airport where government officials and members of the Open Door Society welcomed them. “You had to be upstairs to see the families with little kids. They’re just like all of us. There were babies crying, one got sick, the other was all excited about what they received. You know we all belong to one race and that’s the human race,” said Mayor Don Atchison. Rashid Ahmed was at the arrival gate with friends and members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community in Saskatoon to welcome the newcomers. He came to Canada as a refugee three years ago and is no stranger to hardship. “I know the feeling of refugees because my family was persecuted and they are in that situation right now too. So we are here to support refugees because we know their hardship and we want to welcome them in Canada,” said Ahmed. Those who arrived Saturday were given Roughrider gear to keep them warm. It came in handy when they walked outside and saw huge snowflakes, some for the first time. “They saw the weather, it is very different here. But they said with the warm welcome it doesn’t matter, we are very happy,” said Open Door Society settlement counselor  Zainab Al-Musawi. READ MORE: Former refugees say Canadian winters can be a shock for newcomers The Open Door Society along with partnering organizations have organized meals and temporary apartments until permanent arrangement are made. “We’ll get them prepared to set their bank accounts and the basic services that they need. Also give them orientation and life skills support,” said Open Door Society executive director Ali Abukar. Out of the 14 refugees who arrived, half are government sponsored and the other half are on blended visas, which is a combination of private and government sponsorship. This group may be the first, but they certainly aren’t the last. Eight-hundred to 850 refugees are expected to land in Saskatchewan by the end of February 2016.

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Year in review: Protests, social media scandals and murders make headlines in 2015 From plane crashes to major police investigations to a brutal struggle with the elements, the Maritimes have seen a lot in 2015. As the year comes to a wrap, here are some of the highlights of the stories that made headlines in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick this year. READ MORE: Top national and international stories of 2015 Air Canada flight crash-lands at Halifax airport Transportation Safety Board investigators and airport firefighters work at the crash site of Air Canada AC624. Andrew Vaughan/ Passengers on Air Canada flight 624 traveling from Toronto to Halifax received a shock to their system on March 29, after the airplane they were on crash landed on the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. The AC624 plane crashed after hitting an antenna array when approaching the runway. READ MORE: AC624: Was it a hard landing or a crash? It hit the ground, breaking off the landing gear before it bounced and then skidded to a stop 1,100 feet later. The aircraft’s nose and engine were broken off and one wing was severely damaged. A 12-year-old passenger’s video of the aftermath showed passengers visibly upset and standing cold and frightened on the runway. Raw video: Air Canada flight 624 off runway at Halifax Airport 00:50 Raw video: Air Canada flight 624 off runway at Halifax Airport 03:15 AC flight 624 passengers recount the crash landing in Halifax 02:51 Airport official comments on power loss, slow rescue of AC Flight 624 passengers 02:12 AC Flight 624 passengers describe situation inside plane 02:10 Halifax airport spokesman updates AC flight 624 situation in Halifax 01:35 Traveler at Halifax airport recounts moments after AC Flight 624 crashed 01:25 Traveler waiting for next flight at Halifax airport after flights were canceled 01:38 Woman trying to attend dad’s funeral frustrated with West Jet service Guilty pleas in Loretta Saunders murder trial Loretta Saunders poses in this undated police handout photo. Handout/Halifax Regional Police Blake Legette and Victoria Henneberry were sentenced to life in prison on April 29, after pleading guilty to murdering Loretta Saunders on Feb. 13, 2014. Legette and Henneberry had been subletting an apartment from Saunders. Saunders went to collect rent from the couple on Feb. 13, and was not seen again. Her body was found along a highway median west of Salisbury, N.B on February 26. The death of Saunders sparked a conversation about the increasing numbers of missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada, and prompted more calls for a national inquiry into the nation-wide issue. READ MORE: N.S. party leaders call for inquiry into slain aboriginal women Henneberry has since appealed her conviction. Meningitis scare in Halifax Many Nova Scotians were on high alert after a high school student from Lower Sackville died after being diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis. Rylee Sears, a grade 10 student at Sackville High School died on January 26. Dozens of people who may have been in contact with Sears were contacted and told to be on alert for any symptoms. Sears had been at a party with about 100 teens on the weekend before his diagnosis. The province of Nova Scotia has since started vaccinating against the strain of meningitis that killed the teen, the Y-strain. READ MORE: Nova Scotia to vaccinate against meningitis strain that killed Sackville teen In February, a student at Acadia University in Antogonish died from the B-strain of meningococcal meningitis, which is the most common strain. Liberals sweep Atlantic Canada in federal election Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks with reporters during an interview with in Ottawa on Wednesday, December 16, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Patrick Doyle In one foul swoop, Nova Scotia was in a sea of red after voters voted for change in the 2015 federal election, securing every seat in the province to the Liberals. The securing of Justin Trudeau‘s Liberal majority government made for some major disappointments for many NDP hopefuls who were initially projected to hold onto their seats. READ MORE: Andy Fillmore promises to be ‘champion of Halifax’ after beating Megan Leslie Nova Scotia saw long-time MPs Megan Leslie and Peter Stoffer lose their seats. Dalhousie dentistry scandal The dentistry school at Dalhousie University. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan Just in time for the winter semester, the Dalhousie University school of dentistry was shrouded in scandal when information broke about a controversial Facebook group called “Class of DDS 2015 Gentlemen.” In the Facebook group, investigators found sexist and threatening posts directed at the male students’ female colleagues. The men in the Facebook group were suspended as the group was investigated, and all but one student, Ryan Millet, participated in a restorative justice program before being allowed to graduate with the rest of their classmates. Millet, the so-called “whistle blower” of the Facebook group, attempted to have his record wiped clean, citing the fact that he was the student to come forward and present the posts and expose the group. READ MORE: Dal dentistry student lounge covered with racist, misogynistic, sexist graffiti, report finds The whole scandal prompted a report on sexism, misogyny and homophobia at the Dalhousie School of dentistry, which said there are “complex problems with no easy solutions” present in the school, and put forward several recommendations for the school to take on. Halifax mass murder plot American Lindsay Souvannarath is one of two accused of plotting to open fire at the Halifax Shopping Centre. A mass shooting plot planned for the Halifax Shopping Centre on Valentine’s Day was foiled by police in Halifax the day before it was scheduled to take place. Two of the three involved in the plot were arrested, 23-year-old Lindsay Kantha Souvannarath of Geneva, Ill., and 20-year-old Randall Steven Shepherd of Halifax, and a third, 19-year-old James Gamble, was found dead in his home when police went to arrest him. READ MORE: Who are the ‘Columbiners’? Halifax shooting suspects blogged about school shooters Shepherd and Souvannarath were charged with conspiracy to commit murder and remain in custody in Nova Scotia. Officials maintained that there was no terror threat related to the mass shooting plot. #NSFilmJobs People in the film and television industry are planning a rally outside the Nova Scotia legislature today to protest a tax credit cut. Heide Pearson/Global News The slashing of the Nova Scotia Film Tax Credit caused a stir in Halifax and brought thousands of supporters out to rally against the government’s decision on April 15. The Liberal government announced they would be cutting the tax credit to $6 million from $24 million in next year’s budget. Film producers would have access to an additional $6 million established in a fund for the creative sector. READ MORE: Axing film tax credit in N.S. budget would put jobs at risk: industry group The cutting of the credit put many production houses in jeopardy, as well as forced industries supporting the film industry in the province to close up shop. 16×9 investigation into Moncton RCMP murders RCMP wait for the start of the regimental funeral for Const. Dave Joseph Ross, Douglas James Larche, and Fabrice Georges Gevaudan at the Moncton Coliseum Sean Kilpatrick/ The caskets of Const. Dave Joseph Ross, 32, from Victoriaville, Que., left to right, Const. Douglas James Larche, 40, from Saint John, N.B. and Const. Fabrice Georges Gevaudan, 45, from Boulogne-Billancourt, France, sit in Wesleyan Celebration Centre during the public visitation in Moncton, N.B. on Monday, June 9, 2014. Sean Kilpatrick/ An officer holds Const. Dave Ross’s Stetson with Ross’s dog Danny at the funeral procession for the three RCMP officers who were killed on duty, at their regimental funeral at the Moncton Coliseum in Moncton on Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Andrew Vaughan/ Stetsons rest on the caskets of the three slain RCMP officers, Const Dave Ross, Const. Douglas Larche and Const. Fabrice Gevaudan at a regimental funeral in Moncton, N.B., Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Sean Kilpatrick/ Emergency response officers enter a residence in Moncton, N.B. on Thursday, June 5, 2014. Andrew Vaughan/ An RCMP officer rests his head at a roadblock in Moncton, N.B. on Thursday, June 5, 2014. Andrew Vaughan/ On June 4, 2014, Justin Bourque, heavily armed and on a rampage, shot three Mounties dead and injured two others in Moncton. The entire city was at a stand still as officers were on a manhunt for Bourque who was arrested 30 hours later. READ MORE: Thousands attend RCMP regimental funeral service for Moncton officers After the shooting, Global’s 16X9 investigated the murders of the officers and found that there were gaps in the training and preparedness of officers that responded to the shooting rampage. The RCMP also launched an investigation into the shooting deaths of their officers. Watch the entire 16X9 episode here: Dennis Oland convicted of father’s murder Dennis Oland heads to the Law Courts where he was found guilty of second degree murder in the death of his father, Richard Oland, in Saint John, N.B. on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. Andrew Vaughan/ After a 90 day trial. a jury of 12 men and women convicted Dennis Oland of second degree murder in the bludgeoning death of his father, Richard Oland. It’s a verdict that has shocked many, and with an appeal in the works, the Saint John Police Force’s investigation of Richard Oland’s murder is now being investigated. Richard Oland was found dead in his office in 2011. Though there was no murder weapon found, evidence showed he was repeatedly beaten on the head with a blunt object. READ MORE: Dennis Oland’s wife and mother say he’s innocent, plan appeal The jury in the trial heard countless testimonies, including a highly emotional one from Dennis Oland himself, in which he said he missed his father. Chief medical officer Dr. Eilish Cleary’s firing sparks outrage Dr. Eilish Cleary is pictured here. File/Global News The province of New Brunswick fired their top doctor, and according to Dr. Eilish Cleary, it was done “without cause.” READ MORE: Reaction and speculation grows one day after Dr. Eilish Cleary fired Her firing brought out supporters from the province and all across Canada as many said her termination was a “muzzling” of the doctor and wanted to see her reinstated. The province maintained that Dr. Cleary’s termination was a human resources matter, and wouldn’t be commenting on the matter to maintain the privacy of the parties involved. Crazy winter slams the Maritimes A stop sign is seen buried in snow in Halifax during 2015’s harsh winter that took the region by surprise. Rebecca Lau/Global News As we gear up for another winter, who can forget last year’s harsh and cruel icy cold season? That’s right, no one can. Piles and piles of snow fell on the Maritimes, making getting from point A to point B a rough struggle for many folks. Blizzards upon blizzards pounded the region making snow clearing an uphill battle, and bitterly cold temperatures kept the white stuff on the ground for longer than most wanted to see it for. READ MORE: Halifax is now officially over its snow removal budget for the winter This winter isn’t expected to be so harsh, but with the Maritimes already having gotten a taste of it with two storms, it might be time to get the shovels out and prepare for the worst. Other stories you might have missed Jeep Club volunteers drive Moncton hospital workers during winter storm Canada-wide warrants issued for man, woman sought in ‘extremely violent’ murderAllan Rowe, Nova Scotia MLA and former Global News broadcaster, diesChristopher Phillips found not guilty of threats to police in chemicals caseNo bail for William Sandeson, accused in Taylor Samson’s deathAccused dealt with Catherine Campbell’s body in ‘cavalier’ way: PoliceReport finds Rehtaeh Parsons “did not receive support and assistance” requiredFrankie MacDonald, weather celeb, enjoying “worldwide” popularityRay Bradshaw signs off from Global Halifax one last time: https://长沙夜生活facebook长沙桑拿/globalhalifax/videos/vb.111515975551979/934312186605683/?type=2&theaterLiberals demand full audio recording of Younger-McVicar conversationLife-size Elf on the Shelf causing trouble in Moncton family homeHalifax refugee centre to stop accepting donations due to ‘overwhelming generosity’Moncton teacher uses Star Wars to teach math WATCH: See Moncton’s mountainous snow pile from a drone’s perspective‘I want to burn that stupid rug’: Project Roar aims to change view on sexual assaultMoncton food truck owner says he faces daily racismDartmouth boy fighting cancer gets surprise backyard makeover, meets heroes Crosby and MacKinnon‘One-stop shop’ PTSD clinic for veterans opens in Cole HarbourToronto Maple Leafs replace Riverview super fan’s collection after fire RCMP musical ride marks Moncton shooting anniversaryNew Brunswick woman starts rehab for dogs Manslaughter charges laid against two Bathurst police officers in Michel Vienneau shootingMan who owned python in Campbellton, N.B. attack arrested: lawyerSurette and Fredericks plead guilty to murder of Harley Lawrence

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2015 Year In Review: One-on-one with Carla Qualtrough As the first Paralympian ever elected to Canada’s parliament, there was a certain symmetry in Carla Qualtrough being named Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities. But that didn’t stop the rookie MP for Delta being “over the moon excited” when she found out about her new position. “I had hopes, it wasn’t completely out of left field,” she admits. Related Liberal candidate Carla Qualtrough elected in Delta “But you get called to Ottawa, and you meet with the Prime Minister, and he tells you the two things that matter most to you in the world, you get to help be involved in those on a national level?” she says. Qualtrough, who defeated Conservative cabinet minister Kerry-Lynne Findlay in October’s election, says she’s excited about the possibilities in her portfolio. “On the disability side we have chance to make history,” she says. “We’re going to make new laws. Who gets to say that in their career? It’s an amazing experience.” Qualtrough, who has been visually impaired since birth, said the choice to transition from being a competitive swimmer—where she won three bronze medals in the Paralympic Games—to a human rights lawyer was more natural than it might seem. “As someone with a disability who loved sport, and grew up in a family where we spoke the language of sport, at some point regular sport became too difficult. My vision caught up with me, and I found Paralympic sport, and it changed my world. It also exposed me to discrimination, and to travelling around the world and seeing how people with disabilities are treated elsewhere was quite an eye-opener, and it sparked my interest in human rights,” she says. Qualtrough says she hopes to enact a new national strategy for disabled Canadians. “You have to wait until people are discriminated against until you can help them. So we’re going to try and fix that. We’re going to put in place some kind of legal framework that obligates employers or service providers to accommodate and provide access and inclusion instead of waiting for someone with a disability to take them on,” she says. On the sport front, Qualtrough says the expanding conversation on concussions is likely to occupy her time. “We need to develop a national concussion strategy,” she says. “We need to provide the federal leadership that’s been lacking to develop a comprehensive strategy on prevention, treatment, return to play protocol…there’s going to have to be a huge culture shift, in terms of making it okay to talk about concussions, making it okay for coaches to bench an athlete.” One thing is certain: Qualtrough is aware of the high hopes people have for her. “Both the disability community and sport community are expecting big things from me,” she says.

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Default utility Image Impending guard strike may put prisoners’ rights ‘in peril’, expert says

A strike could see prisoners locked in their cells without access...

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Recent Posts

Default utility Image Impending guard strike may put prisoners’ rights ‘in peril’, expert says

A strike could see prisoners locked in their cells without access...

Default utility Image Ontario mayor’s letter insists province stop online ticket gouging

SARNIA, Ont. —; Mayor Mike Bradley’s letter to the Ontario attorney...

Default utility Image Syrian refugees arrive in Saskatoon

SASKATOON – Fourteen Syrian refugees arrived in Saskatoon Saturday evening....

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From plane crashes to major police investigations to a brutal struggle...

Default utility Image 2015 Year In Review: One-on-one with Carla Qualtrough

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